3 Simple Ways to Stop Dogs from Digging in Flower Bed

Imagine all the effort you put into growing beautiful flowers going to waste because of your dog’s tendency to dig in the flower bed. Here are some simple ways to prevent this from happening using cheap and effective methods.

1. Tired dogs are happy dogs

Boredom is one of the most common reasons for dogs that dig in the flower bed. Don’t give them a reason to dig in such places. Make sure they are getting plenty of stimulation through fun activities and extended dog walks. Letting them roam around the backyard on their own doesn’t count. Dogs are social animals. They enjoy interaction.

2. Offer an alternative digging spot

Some dogs are habitual diggers and there isn’t much wrong with that as digging is part of their natural behavior. If you don’t mind the digging, find an alternative spot for the dog to enjoy plenty of digging. One option might be to get a child sandpit. The sandpit should be positioned well away from the flower bed. Positive reinforcement methods can train your dog to dig in the sandpit and nowhere else in the backyard.

3. Build a physical barrier

This might be the only solution if you want to let your dog out into the yard unsupervised. Setting up a chicken wire barrier would be one cost-effective way of keeping dogs out of the flower bed. You need to make sure the chicken wire fence also goes a few inches deep into the soil to stop the dog from digging underneath the barrier.

Some dog owners did, however, mentioned that this method didn’t work for them. The chicken wire fence only proved to be a bigger challenge for the dog and it didn’t take long for their pet to make tear through the fencing. The chicken wire method might work better for keeping out small to medium-sized dogs from the flower bed.

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Disclaimer: The content on MyPetChild.com is for informational purpose only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian when in doubt.

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