Dog has Black Gums and Bad Breath – Top 3 Reasons Why

Disclaimer: The content on MyPetChild.com is for informational purpose only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a veterinarian when in doubt.

The following reasons may help explain dogs that suddenly develop black gums around their teeth and bad breath.

1. Dog has gum disease

Black gums and bad breath are common symptoms of gum diseases like gingivitis, which occurs when there is a build-up of plaque bacteria in the dog’s teeth. Many dog owners don’t take good care of their dog’s teeth. There are several ways to help maintain your dog’s dental health such as by feeding your dog dental chews to help reduce tartar buildup and by using enzymatic toothpaste to help freshen a dog’s breath.

2. Dog has a broken tooth

Your dog’s breath might smell like death because he is suffering from a broken tooth. An untreated broken tooth is an open invitation for bacteria to enter and infect the dog’s body. The darkening of the dog’s gum, especially the area around the broken tooth, might be an indication of a bacterial infection spreading across the dog’s mouth. Broken and cracked teeth is extremely painful for dogs and should be treated promptly.

3. Black gums are normal for certain dog breeds

The appearance of black gums could actually be normal for certain dog breeds like chow chows and shar peis. Bad breath, however, isn’t and could be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Bad breath doesn’t just originate from the mouth. It could also come from the dog’s nose or the upper part of the dog’s gastrointestinal tract. In addition to dental diseases, your vet will need to rule out potential diseases in the dog’s digestive tract, such as in the stomach and esophagus.

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