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100+ Human Foods Dogs Can & Can't Eat

We dog owners like to feed our dogs some human food from time to time. The reality is that a lot of human foods aren't entirely safe or healthy for dogs to eat so it's important to be able to distinguish the bad from the good. We did the hard work for you and present you a list of 100+ human foods dogs should and shouldn't eat.

What Can Dogs Eat
How to use this database
There are two columns to pay attention to: (1) is it toxic and (2) is it safe? The toxic column indicates whether the food is known for having ingredients or substances that are toxic to dogs. The safety column indicates whether the food is generally considered safe for dogs to eat in moderation accounting for other factors aside from toxicity risks. It's important to make this distinction because some foods might still be dangerous to a dog's health despite not containing toxic substances.
Disclaimer
The recommendations in the database are based on broad assumptions so don't take it at face value. Human foods come in many varieties so it's possible for a food listed as safe in our database to actually be unsafe if what you have at home contains additional ingredients that aren't considered conventional. Always do your due diligence and check the product's ingredient list before you give any human foods to your pet.
Human food Is it toxic? Is it safe? What to know
BananaNoYesThe natural sugar found in bananas may cause stomach upsets so make sure dogs are only given bananas in moderation
Cottage cheeseNoYesDairy products like cottage cheese should only be given in tiny amounts as dogs are lactose intolerant
Corn beefNoNoCorn beef is bad for dogs because it contains an excessive amount of salt and fat
ScallopNoYesA small amount of scallop meat is safe for dogs to eat as long as the meat is properly cooked
LobsterNoYesA small amount of plainly-cooked lobster meat should be fine for most dogs
SugarNoNoDogs can suffer from digestion problems following excessive sugar intake
ParsleyNoYesMost dogs should be fine with eating a small amount of parsley (the curly variety)
BasilNoYesA small amount of basil could be beneficial for dogs due to its anti-inflammatory property
Greek yogurtNoYesDogs can enjoy plain Greek yoghurt in small amounts but double-check the ingredients list for potential safety hazards
Cream cheeseNoYesPlain cream cheese should only be fed to dogs in small amounts due to the lactose and fat content
Pork boneNoNoDogs shouldn't eat pork bones as they introduce the risk of internal bleeding and choking
Lamb boneNoYesThick lamb bones (uncooked) may be okay for dogs to chew on while under supervision
CilantroNoYesA small amount of cilantro may help dogs with upset stomachs or digestion problems
Olive oilNoYesYou can add olive oil to your dog's diet as long as it's in small amounts
CrackerNoNoDogs shouldn't be given a large amount of crackers as some products may contain a large amount of salt
PersimmonNoYesPersimmon is safe for dogs to eat in small amounts as long as the seeds are discarded
ApricotNoYesThe flesh of ripe apricots is safe for dogs to eat in small amounts
Butternut squashNoYesRaw butternut squash can be hard for dogs to digest and may eventually lead to gastrointestinal upsets
GrapefruitNoNoDogs may suffer from mild gastrointestinal problems due to the acidic content of grapefruit
ChickenNoYesDogs are fine with eating plainly-cooked chicken meat (without the bone)
SausageNoNoDogs shouldn't eat processed meat like sausage as they contain high number of sodium and preservatives
ApplesauceNoYesDogs should only be fed a limited amount of plain applesauce as they may contain a high amount of sugar and artificial preservatives
ButterNoNoDogs shouldn't be fed butter as it only consists of fat
Rib boneNoNoDogs shouldn't be given rib bones as they introduce the risk of internal bleeding and choking
AppleNoYesThe flesh of the apple can make a healthy snack for dogs
Honeydew melonNoYesHoneydew melons can make healthy treats for dogs as long as it's given in moderation
TofuNoYesTofu may cause gas and bloating in dogs so only give in small amounts
Turkey boneNoNoDogs shouldn't be fed turkey bones as they introduce the risk of internal bleeding and choking
BeefNoYesOnly allow dogs to eat plainly-cooked beef
FigNoYesFigs should be fed to dogs in limited amounts due to the high amount of natural sugar
PrawnNoYesA small amount of plainly-cooked prawn meat should be safe for most dogs unless they have allergies
Brussels sproutNoYesRaw brussel sprouts aren't recommended for dogs as they aren't easy for dogs to digest
Corn flakeNoYesMost dogs are fine with eating a small amount of corn flake but it isn't something you should give regularly as they can be empty calories
Lima beanNoYesA large amount of lima beans may cause bloat in dogs
Potato chipNoNoProcessed snacks like potato chips aren't healthy for dogs due to the amount of salt and artificial preservatives
Saltine crackerNoNoSaltine crackers aren't healthy for dogs due to the high sodium content
String beanNoYesString beans could become a choking hazard for dogs if they aren't prepared appropriately
DateNoYesOnly give dates in small amounts as they contain a lot of natural sugar
Mandarin orangeNoYesThe natural sugar and the acidic property of Mandarin oranges may cause stomach upsets so limit the amount you feed to dogs
AbaloneNoYesYou could let your dog try a small amount of plainly-cooked abalone but it isn't recommended
SherbetNoNoDogs shouldn't be fed sherbets as they may cause stomach upsets due to the presence of lactose, fat, and sugar
HaddockNoYesOnly allowed dogs to eat plainly-cooked haddock (without the bones)
Sesame seedNoYesSesame seeds aren't toxic to dogs but some dogs may have allergic reactions to them
TurnipNoYesCut the turnip into bite-sized pieces before feeding it to your dog
Sesame oilNoNoSesame oil isn't considered toxic to dogs but there isn't a major health benefit to letting them eat it either
AubergineNoYesAubergine shouldn't be given to dogs with kidney or bladder problems as they are oxalate-rich
Beef boneNoYesThick beef bones (uncooked) may be okay for dogs to chew on while under supervision
ClamNoYesA small amount of clam is safe for dogs to eat as long as the meat is properly cooked
MulberryNoYesMost dogs can eat fresh mulberries in small amounts as long as it's in moderation
Turkey baconNoNoDogs shouldn't eat processed meat like turkey bacon as they contain high number of sodium and preservatives
Mint leavesNoNoMint leaves may cause gastrointestinal problems like diarrhea and vomiting
ArugulaNoYesArugula shouldn't be fed to dogs that suffer from thyroid-related issues
Plain biscuitNoYesDogs can eat biscuits but make sure it doesn't contain hidden ingredients like xylitol (artificial sweetener) which are toxic to dogs
ArtichokeNoYesPlain artichoke should be chopped into smaller bite-sized pieces before it's fed to dogs
JicamaNoYesDogs can eat a small amount of fresh jicama as long as the tuberous root is cut into bite-sized pieces
Sour creamNoNoDogs shouldn't eat sour cream as the lactose and fat content may cause stomach upsets
NectarineNoYesThe natural sugar and the acidic property of nectarines may cause stomach upsets so limit the amount you feed to dogs
Dragon fruitNoYesDragon fruits can make good natural treats for dogs as long as they are given in small pieces
BeetNoYesWe recommend cutting the beet into smaller pieces so that it's easier for dogs to digest
PopcornNoNoDogs shouldn't eat popcorn, especially salted and buttered popcorn, due to the high salt and fat content
ChickpeaNoYesMost dogs are fine with eating a small amount of plain chickpea
CherryNoYesMost dogs can eat the flesh of fresh cherries in small amounts
RaspberryNoYesRaspberries are safe for dogs to eat as long as it's in moderation
Peanut butterNoYesOnly allow dogs to eat natural peanut butter that don't contain toxic ingredients like xylitol
PeachNoYesThe flesh of fresh peaches are fine for most dogs to eat as long as it's in small amounts
Plain breadNoYesDogs can eat bread but it's best to limit the amount because bread is considered empty calories
PotatoNoYesMost dogs should be fine with eating plainly-cooked potatoes (without the skin)
PearNoYesThe flesh of fresh pears are fine for most dogs to eat as a treat
MushroomNoYesOnly allow dogs to eat a small amount of store-bought mushrooms
CeleryNoYesDogs might suffer from mild gastrointestinal issues due to the difficulty of digesting celery stems
CornNoYesIt should be safe for dogs to eat a small amount of plain corn kernels
AlmondNoNoDogs shouldn't eat almonds as they aren't easy for dogs and puppies to digest
CarrotNoYesCarrots make a healthy, low-calorie snack for dogs
PeaNoYesFresh peas are fine for most dogs to eat in moderation
CheeseNoYesDairy products like cheese should only be given in tiny amounts as dogs are lactose intolerant
MangoNoYesDiscard the mango pit and skin as both may cause blockage in the dog's digestive tract
BroccoliNoYesBroccoli is safe for dogs to eat if they are first chopped into smaller bite-sized pieces
CucumberNoYesCucumbers are healthy treats for dogs and are known for their hydration benefits
AvocadoNoYesMost dogs should be okay with eating a small amount of ripe avocado flesh
OrangeNoYesThe natural sugar and the acidic property of oranges may cause stomach upsets so limit the amount you feed to dogs
PineappleNoYesA small amount pineapples (flesh only) can make a healthy snack for dogs
TomatoNoYesDogs can eat the flesh of a ripe tomato
BlackberryNoYesBlackberries can make good natural treats for dogs but should only be given in small amounts
BlueberryNoYesBlueberries can make good natural treats for dogs but should only be given in small amounts
WatermelonNoYesMake sure the watermelon rinds and seeds are discarded first
StrawberryNoYesStrawberries are fine for most dogs as long as you don't also give them leaves and stems
TunaNoYesConsider feeding your dog other types of fish as tuna is known for having a high concentration of mercury in comparison to other species of fish
Deer boneNoYesThick deer bones (uncooked) may be okay for dogs to chew on while under supervision
HoneyNoYesHoney isn't toxic but limit the amount you feed to dogs as they do contain a lot of sugar
BeanNoYesCertain types of beans aren't safe for dogs to eat, such as broad beans and raw kidney beans
OatmealNoYesOnly allow dogs to eat a small amount of soaked oatmeal (without additional favoring and condiments)
Plain YoghurtNoYesA small amount of plain yoghurt will be fine for most dogs as long as there isn't any toxic ingredients like xylitol
PlumNoYesDogs can eat a small amount of plum (excluding the seed) as long as it's in moderation
Ice creamNoNoDogs shouldn't eat ice cream as they contain a high amount of lactose and sugar
RiceNoYesIt's fine for dogs to eat plainly-cooked rice as long as it's not a direct substitute for dog food
EggNoYesPlainly-cooked eggs are safe for dogs to eat in moderation
BaconNoNoDogs shouldn't eat processed meat like bacon as they contain high number of sodium and preservatives
PorkNoYesOnly allow dogs to eat plainly-cooked pork
CoconutNoYesAvoid giving dogs too much coconut as the flesh and milk contains oils that may cause issues like stomach upsets and loose stools
FishNoYesDogs are fine with eating many species of fish as long as they are plainly-cooked and served without bones
GingerNoYesA small amount of ginger can be added to your dog's diet
HamNoNoDogs shouldn't eat processed meat like ham as they contain high number of sodium and preservatives
SeaweedNoNoSeaweeds could be a safety hazard for dogs as they may cause blockages in the dog's gastrointestinal tract
Chicken boneNoNoDogs shouldn't eat chicken bones as they introduce the risk of internal bleeding and choking
Hot dogNoNoDogs shouldn't eat processed meat like hot dogs as they contain high number of sodium and preservatives
TurkeyNoYesDogs can be fed plainly-cooked turkey meat (without the bone)
AsparagusNoYesPlain asparagus can be fed to dogs in small amounts
Sweet potatoNoYesIt should be fine for most dogs to eat a small amount of plainly-cooked sweet potato without the skin
SalmonNoYesIt's safe for most dogs to eat plainly-cooked salmon (without the bone)
NutsYesNoDog owners need to take extra care with nuts as some varieties are toxic to dogs
LemonYesNoDogs shouldn't eat lemons as they contain compounds like psoralens and essential oils such as limonene, both of which may cause gastrointestinal upsets
GrapesYesNoDogs shouldn't eat grapes as the toxicity mechanism of grapes is known to cause serious health issues for dogs
Baked beanYesNoDogs shouldn't eat baked beans due to the high sodium and fat content as well as the possiblity of containing toxic ingredients
RaisinYesNoDogs shouldn't eat raisins as the toxicity mechanism of grapes is known to cause serious health issues for dogs
Roast beefYesNoDogs shouldn't eat roast beef as typical recipes contain toxic ingredients like garlic and onion
White chocolateYesNoWhite chocolate is dangerous to dogs due to the presence of theobromine
TaroYesNoDogs shouldn't eat taro as it contains insoluble calcium oxalates, which may cause mouth pain and tissue irritation
AcornYesNoDogs must never be given acorns as they contain a toxic compound called tannin which can cause damage to the dog's liver and kidneys
Chewing gumYesNoDogs shouldn't eat chewing gum due to the risk of blockage as well as risk of containing toxic ingredients like xylitol
GuacamoleYesNoGuacamole recipes typically contain ingredients that are unsafe for dogs such as onion and garlic
OnionYesNoDogs shouldn't eat onions as they contain compounds like N-propyl disulfide which can lead to dangerous health conditions like anemia
GarlicYesNoDogs shouldn't eat garlic as the the presence of thiosulfate can cause serious health problems like anemia
MustardYesNoMustard and mustard seeds can have mild toxicity to dogs
LimeYesNoDogs shouldn't eat lime as they contain compounds like psoralens and essential oils such as limonene, both of which may cause gastrointestinal upsets
ChocolateYesNoDogs shouldn't eat chocolate as the presence of theobromine makes it toxic to pets
Macadamia nutYesNoDogs shouldn't eat macadamia nuts as these nuts are known to cause symptoms like body tremors and vomiting

General Human Food Safety Tips for Dogs

Here are some general rules to consider to help you determine what human food is safe or unsafe for dogs to eat in moderation.

The 10% rule

Just because certain foods are safe for dogs doesn't mean you should be letting them eat a lot of it. Follow the 10% rule where human food and treats shouldn't consist of more than 10% of a dog's daily calorie intake.

Introducing new food

Whenever you introduce a new food or treat to your dog, you should always test it first by only letting the dog eat a tiny bite-size piece. This will allow you to monitor for allergies and other health complications.

Offer small pieces

Certain foods, such as fruits, may pose a choking risk for dogs due to having a hard texture. Always purée, mash, or cut the human food into smaller pieces to reduce the risk of obstructions forming in the dog's gastrointestinal tract.

Check the product ingredient label

Always check what ingredients a store-bought food contains before you let your dog eat it. Certain products may contain hidden ingredients that are toxic to dogs. Xylitol, for example, is toxic to dogs and used in many dessert recipes and products.

Lactose intolerance

Dogs are lactose intolerant so it's best to not feed them any foods that use dairy products as a primary ingredient. Dogs with lactose intolerance that eat dairy-based products may suffer from diarrhea, vomiting, and other digestive symptoms.

Keep it plain

Avoid letting your dog eat food that contains seasoning and additives. Too much salt or sugar, for example, is harmful for dogs.

Avoid 'empty' calorie food

Avoid feeding your dog human foods that are high in calories and low in nutrients, such as plain bread. These foods can lead to weight gains and increase the long-term risk of health problems like heart disease.

Safe cooking methods

some vegetables are better-served cooked than raw. We would suggest roasting, baking, or steaming the vegetables before you feed them to your dog. Boiling works as well but nutrients may leak out from the vegetables during the boiling process.

Dogs with health conditions

We strongly consulting a veterinarian if your dog has a chronic health condition like diabetes, liver or kidney disease, and food sensitivities. The diet of these dogs is a lot more restricted. Some of the foods we list as 'safe' in the database might not actually be safe for them due to specific health conditions.

What to Do if Your Dog Gets Sick from eating Human Food

Is your dog not feeling well within a few hours of eating something? We recommend calling the vet immediately to determine whether an emergency visit is necessary. The severity of symptoms from eating unsafe human foods can range from mild to severe.

For mild cases, dogs may just end up with a stomach upset or temporary diarrhea which will eventually disappear after a couple of days. In such cases, the vet may just ask you to monitor the dog, especially if it only involves a tiny amount of human food.

Severe cases, on the other hand, can be really dangerous for dogs. For example, there was news recently of a dog that needed life-saving emergency surgery after eating several packets of chocolate coins. It's not just the chocolate which is dangerous to dogs, it's the wrapper as well (which can cause obstructions in the dog's digestive system). Never assume your dog is okay after eating unsafe human foods, even if their behavior suggests they are fine. Some dogs may instinctively try to hide their sickness so it's best to call the vet for advice.

If your vet isn't immediately available then another option is to call an organization like the Pet Poison Hotline. They may also be able to give you emergency advice if your dog ate something he shouldn't have.