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What Fruits Dogs Can and Cannot Eat

Not all fruits are safe for dogs to eat despite the health benefits they may have. Here is a list of fruits dogs should either stay away from or can enjoy as long as it's fed in moderation.

What Fruits Can Dogs Eat
How to use this database
There are two columns to pay attention to: (1) is it toxic and (2) is it safe? The toxic column indicates whether the fruit is known for being toxic to dogs. The safety column indicates whether the fruit is generally considered safe for dogs to eat in moderation accounting for other factors aside from toxicity risks. It's important to make this distinction because some fruits might still be dangerous to a dog's health despite not containing toxic substances.
Fruits Is it toxic? Is it safe? What to know
BananaNoYesThe natural sugar found in bananas may cause stomach upsets so make sure dogs are only given bananas in moderation
AppleNoYesThe flesh of the apple can make a healthy snack for dogs
Mandarin orangeNoYesThe natural sugar and the acidic property of Mandarin oranges may cause stomach upsets so limit the amount you feed to dogs
MulberryNoYesMost dogs can eat fresh mulberries in small amounts as long as it's in moderation
PersimmonNoYesPersimmon is safe for dogs to eat in small amounts as long as the seeds are discarded
ApricotNoYesThe flesh of ripe apricots is safe for dogs to eat in small amounts
GrapefruitNoNoDogs may suffer from mild gastrointestinal problems due to the acidic content of grapefruit
Dragon fruitNoYesDragon fruits can make good natural treats for dogs as long as they are given in small pieces
Honeydew melonNoYesHoneydew melons can make healthy treats for dogs as long as it's given in moderation
NectarineNoYesThe natural sugar and the acidic property of nectarines may cause stomach upsets so limit the amount you feed to dogs
FigNoYesFigs should be fed to dogs in limited amounts due to the high amount of natural sugar
PlumNoYesDogs can eat a small amount of plum (excluding the seed) as long as it's in moderation
CoconutNoYesAvoid giving dogs too much coconut as the flesh and milk contains oils that may cause issues like stomach upsets and loose stools
CherryNoYesMost dogs can eat the flesh of fresh cherries in small amounts
RaspberryNoYesRaspberries are safe for dogs to eat as long as it's in moderation
PeachNoYesThe flesh of fresh peaches are fine for most dogs to eat as long as it's in small amounts
PearNoYesThe flesh of fresh pears are fine for most dogs to eat as a treat
MangoNoYesDiscard the mango pit and skin as both may cause blockage in the dog's digestive tract
AvocadoNoYesMost dogs should be okay with eating a small amount of ripe avocado flesh
OrangeNoYesThe natural sugar and the acidic property of oranges may cause stomach upsets so limit the amount you feed to dogs
PineappleNoYesA small amount pineapples (flesh only) can make a healthy snack for dogs
BlackberryNoYesBlackberries can make good natural treats for dogs but should only be given in small amounts
BlueberryNoYesBlueberries can make good natural treats for dogs but should only be given in small amounts
WatermelonNoYesMake sure the watermelon rinds and seeds are discarded first
StrawberryNoYesStrawberries are fine for most dogs as long as you don't also give them leaves and stems
DateNoYesOnly give dates in small amounts as they contain a lot of natural sugar
LemonYesNoDogs shouldn't eat lemons as they contain compounds like psoralens and essential oils such as limonene, both of which may cause gastrointestinal upsets
GrapesYesNoDogs shouldn't eat grapes as the toxicity mechanism of grapes is known to cause serious health issues for dogs
LimeYesNoDogs shouldn't eat lime as they contain compounds like psoralens and essential oils such as limonene, both of which may cause gastrointestinal upsets

General Fruit Feeding Tips for Dogs

Here are some rules to consider to help you determine what fruit is or isn't safe for dogs to eat in moderation.

The 10% rule

Fruits shouldn't be considered a staple in the dog's diet. Instead, they should be considered a supplement or a healthy treat. Make sure that fruits, as nutritious as some are, don't account for more than 10% of a dog's daily calorie intake.

Introducing new food

Dogs can also suffer from allergies or other reactions when they are introduced to something they haven't ate before. Please be aware of this before feeding any new fruits to your dog. Fruit allergy is a thing and may result in various symptoms such as skin itching and vomiting.

Offer small pieces

Some fruits have textures that aren't quick to digest. It's important to prepare the fruits beforehand and cut them into smaller pieces so that it's easier for the dog to chew and swallow. This is especially important for puppies or dogs of smaller breeds.

Dogs with health conditions

If your dog suffers from any chronic health conditions then it's strongly recommended you check with the vet before you let the dog eat any fruit-based treats. The consumption of certain fruits can exacerbate health issues. For example, it's not recommended for dogs suffering from pancreatitis to eat too many fruits that have a high amount of natural sugar.

Be Careful with the Fruit Seed

Quite a few fruits have flesh that's safe for dogs to eat when ripe. The same, however, can't be said for the seed or pit. Certain fruit seeds may contain cyanide compounds that are toxic to dogs. Ingesting seeds also increase the risk of choking so it's important to discard them before you let your dog eat any fruits.

Avoiding the Dirty Dozen

Some fruits are known for being exposed to a higher concentration of pesticide than others. This may include strawberries, nectarines, and apples. We would avoid feeding your dog any of these fruits unless they are truly organic.

What to Do if Your Dog Gets Sick from eating Fruits

Not all situations require a visit to the emergency vet, especially if the dog only ate a tiny amount of "unsafe" fruit. That said, if you are ever in doubt then please call the vet immediately. Symptoms don't always pop up immediately so any delay can make your dog even more sick.

As an alternative choice, you could also call the pet poison hotline and they may offer you the appropriate next steps based on the dog's situation and the amount of "toxic" fruits he consumed. If you find out early enough then the situation could be resolved by inducing vomiting in dogs (before the fruit content gets digested).

Want to know what else aside from fruits are safe for dogs to eat? Check out our full list of human foods that dogs should or shouldn't eat.